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MOSE Project

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Cost

Initial:
5.5 Billion EUR

Project Status

In Progress/Under Construction since 2020

Keywords

Coastal protection
high tide
retractable barriers

Challenges Addressed

Flooding
Coastal & Tidal Flooding
Hurricanes & Severe Storms
Sea Level Rise

Motivation

Resilient city

Project Type

Project

At a Glance

MOSE is a large coastal project designed to protect Venice, Italy, from extreme, chronic flooding. It features an integrated system made up of rows of mobile gates installed at the Lido, Malamocco and Chioggia inlets to temporarily isolate the Venetian Lagoon from the Adriatic Sea during high tides. Together with other measures - such as coastal reinforcement of the barrier island, the raising of quaysides, and the paving and improving the lagoon - MOSE is designed to protect Venice and the lagoon from tides of up to 3 metres (9.8 ft). What makes MOSE unique is its flexibility. It can be operated in different ways according to the characteristics and height of the tide. For example, all three inlets can be closed in the case of an exceptional event, the inlets can be closed one at a time according to the winds, atmospheric pressure and height of tide forecast, or each inlet can be partially closed. MOSE has a total of 78 gates. One lock for large shipping at the Malamocco inlet enables port activities to continue when the gates are in operation. About 30 minutes are required to raise the gates and another 15 minutes to lower the gates back into their housing structures. During a tidal event the inlet will remain closed for 4 to 5 hours. MOSE began construction in 2013 and is expected to be complete and begin operation by 2018.

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