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Bolivar Park Smart Stormwater Capture Project

Lakewood, CA, USA

At a Glance

Stormwater reuse project that integrates real-time controls and sensors to provide irrigation water for a park.

Problem Addressed

Water quality and stormwater management are an ongoing challenge for Lakewood. Irrigation, in particular, represents an area of opportunity to simultaneously reduce water use and improve water quality. Bolivar Park, in particular, previously used 100% potable water for all irrigation needs.

City of Lakewood used/is using stormwater reuse with an active control system to address this/these challenge(s).

Solution(s) Used

As part of the Los Cerritos Watershed Management Plan, the City of Lakewood is implementing a smart regional stormwater best management practice that results in water quality improvements in the Los Cerritos channel, enables stormwater infiltration, and provides an alternate water supply for the park's irrigation needs. The design of the stormwater capture and reuse project in Bolivar Park consisted of an air-inflated, rubber dam diversion system to redirect all urban and stormwater runoff from the Los Cerritos channel through a pre-treatment system that removes trash, debris, and sediment. A pump station and drainage pipeline conveys the water into a 2.9-million-gallon, multi-chambered storage and infiltration facility beneath the park. The collected stormwater is then treated and used to irrigate the landscaped areas in Bolivar Park, satisfying 100% of the park's 9.5-million-gallons-per-year irrigation needs. What made this project particularly unique was the use of real-time controls. The sensors installed in the underground storage facility and infiltration chamber monitor and measure water levels and are connected to National Weather Service data through a secure, cloud-based system to assess the likelihood of upcoming precipitation. If rain is anticipated, the technology will evaluate whether the stormwater capture system has the capacity to perform during the upcoming storm to avoid flooding. If the system does not have adequate storage capacity, it will evaluate other options such as reducing the diversion rate, increasing irrigation use, evaluating the infiltration rates for groundwater recharge, or discharging filtered stormwater back into the channel. The implementing team conducted water quality model simulations to assess the performance potential for the project during the preliminary engineering stage of design.

Outcomes

  1. Collect stormwater is satisfying 100% of the park's 9.5-million-gallons-per-year irrigation needs.
  2. The use of active control systems will boost the water quality pollutant capture performance by up to 50% by responding in real-time to respond to various storm conditions.

Something Unique

The use of real-time controls: The sensors installed in the underground storage facility and infiltration chamber monitor and measure water levels and are connected to National Weather Service data through a secure, cloud-based system to assess the likelihood of upcoming precipitation.

Who Should Consider?

Other communities considering water reuse or otherwise seeking to reduce water use, especially if they've identified irrigation as an opportunity area.

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