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Blue Heron Watershed: Staten Island Bluebelt

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Cost

Initial:
2 Million USD

Project Status

Operational since 2005

Keywords

stormwater
greenspace
Wetland remediation
runoff
retention

Challenges Addressed

Flooding
Coastal & Tidal Flooding
Stormwater Management

Motivation

Resilient city

Project Type

Project

At a Glance

The Blue Heron Watershed, approximately 264 acres, is one of 16 watersheds in the South Richmond, Staten Island Bluebelt supporting New York City Department of Environmental Protection’s South Richmond Drainage Plan, which uses “best management practices” (BMPs) to control stormwater. The Blue Heron Watershed project included three stormwater wetlands with extended detention, an existing pond retrofit, a stream creation/realignment, and two outlet stilling basins. The project represented New York City's first large-scale implementation of sediment and erosion-control features. Specifically the project included: (1) a 1-acre extended detention pond that leveraged prior disturbance along unbuilt roads to establish a controlled stormwater discharge point to reduce erosion, build an overflow weir to regulate discharge, and restore wetland vegetation, (2) a shallow marsh system to manage stormwater runoff that flowed from two streets into a standing pool at the intersection of the streets, (3) an improved outlet structure for an existing set of connected ponds to handle 51 acres of stormwater overflow from streets to the south and installation of a flow splitter to conveys flow into the existing under street storm sewer system, and (4) creation of a 550 linear feet shallow stream corridor through a woodland, with a floodplain, to reduce flooding and erosion downstream. Overall, the Staten Island Blue belt is a $48 million program estimated to generate capital cost savings about $30 million.

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