Back to School: Infrastructure, Education, and Jobs

By Owen Barrett (Co-Founder and CEO, lumeo)

 

Politicians love to talk about how investments in infrastructure can create jobs and can drive local economic development. In theory, it’s a great concept. But it seems like we’re missing an enormous opportunity in how these promises can actually lead to long-term, sustainable economic development. On a national, state, and local level, we are missing the opportunity to invest in our children’s futures as we invest in our infrastructure. Systems cannot be sustainable, nor can cities be smart, if they lack the human component.

Upgrading infrastructure — from roads and bridges to classrooms and office buildings — to be smarter and more sustainable requires highly educated architects, engineers, urban planners, and lots of highly skilled electricians, technicians, and operators. Sustainable infrastructure requires a cadre of people who take an interdisciplinary approach and effectively use systems thinking, data, and financial analysis. Even though the number of jobs in sustainability-related fields, and STEM fields more broadly, are growing rapidly, there are entire segments of American children who, by and large, are not entering these essential fields in the numbers needed.

If we want to capitalize on the opportunity to leverage infrastructure investments for investments in our children’s futures, if we want to build towards a sustainable future, we need to go back to school.

 

Why? Schools, of course, are the places where children learn about the world and their unique place in it. But schools are also local infrastructure.

Right now, when schools invest in upgrades like renewable energy, xeriscaping, and energy efficiency, facilities departments design, manage, and implement projects without any student engagement. The work is usually done during the summertime, on holiday breaks, or after hours to avoid disrupting the learning process. But that’s backwards. If we really want and need children to be more excited about STEM-related fields, school upgrades are opportunities to expand the learning process, not disrupt it.

Continue reading “Back to School: Infrastructure, Education, and Jobs”